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Reuben A. Guttman, District of Columbia Fellow, Co-Publishes “Pretrial Advocacy”

District of Columbia Fellow Reuben A. Guttman has co-authored a new book, “Pretrial Advocacy,” to be released by the National Institute for Trial Advocacy. (Now available in print and e-book here.) The volume, which was also written by Rutgers Professor J.C. Lore, discusses the “unwritten rules” of pre-trial preparation and grapples with the challenges of efficiently developing cases that can stand up to jury scrutiny in the face of overflowing demand, even though 90% of civil cases never make it to trial.

If anybody is qualified to talk about effective legal advocacy, its Reuben Guttman. The Guttman, Buschner & Brooks founding partner has spent his 36-year career releasing staggering sums of money from the grasps of oil refineries, pharmaceutical organizations, and prisons who have run afoul of laws such as the False Claims Act and the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act. Mr. Guttman, who started his legal career as counsel for the Service Employees International Union, AFL-CIO, is a whistleblower’s best friend—in 2015, he helped Florida’s Lynn Szymoniak gain an $18 million settlement after she uncovered a fraudulent foreclosure scheme that threatened to undermine her own housing and that of thousands of other homeowners.

In addition to being a legal superstar, Mr. Guttman is a familiar figure in the academy and the press. When he isn’t giving his time to Emory University School of Law as an adjunct professor, journal advisor, or board member, he’s writing for or being quoted in more than 30 journals and media outlets as varied as The New York Times and Peking University Public Interest Law Journal. Mr. Guttman’s international influence stretches from the U.S. federal government, where he has testified before Congress and advised President Clinton’s transition team, to as far away as China, where he has offered his thoughts on Chinese labor laws at the Dutch Embassy and lectured at universities in Shanghai and Beijing.

Source: American Bar Foundation.

Now Available in print and e-book here.

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On the Rule of Law: Now is the Time to Rethink the Role of Law Schools

In his opening remarks to a Senate Judiciary Committee charged with reviewing his nomination to be Attorney General of the United States, Judge Merrick Garland noted that “communities of color and other minorities still face discrimination in housing, in education, in employment and in the criminal justice system, and they bear the brunt of the harm caused by the pandemic . . . .” All of these problems still exist over 150 years since the passage of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments; over sixty years since Brown v. Board of Education was decided; and over half a century since the civil rights legislation of the 1960s.

The truth is that we — as a mature nation — had a lot to overcome; today our nation remains tainted by an ugly upbringing, the history of which has too often been glossed over in palatable terms…

Read the full piece below.

https://medium.com/@rguttman/on-the-rule-of-law-now-is-the-time-to-rethink-the-role-of-law-schools-1f9e707ee4a1

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Oglethorpe Inc. Agrees to Pay $10.25 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Lawsuit

Florida based Oglethorpe Inc. and it’s three Ohio treatment facilities will pay $10.25 million to settle allegations of illegal patient kickback provisions, unnecessary inpatient admission, and the resulting submission of false claims to Medicare. The suit alleged that Oglethorpe’s treatment centers, which include two inpatient psychiatric hospitals and one substance abuse treatment facility, provided free long-distance transportation to induce patients to seek treatment at the facilities. Claims submitted to Medicare or Medicaid for services provided to these patients violate the Anti-Kickback Statute and therefore constitute false claims. The government also accused Oglethorpe of submitting claims for medically unnecessary inpatient admissions and associated services, which are also false claims.

The civil settlement resolves claims that were brought under the qui tam or whistleblower provision of the False Claims Act. The whistleblower in this case, a former client advocate at one of Oglethorpe’s facilities, will receive a percentage share of the total funds recovered.

Read the DOJ press release here: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/ohio-treatment-facilities-and-corporate-parent-agree-pay-1025-million-resolve-false-claims

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Insitu Inc. to Settle False Claims Allegations for $25 million

Washington State company Insitu Inc., an unmanned aerial vehicle contractor, has agreed to pay $25 million to settle allegations that it submitted false cost and pricing data for determination of contract value with the U.S. Special Operations Command and Navy. The lawsuit was built upon evidence that between 2009 and 2017 Insitu entered into multiple federal contracts that were based on pricing data for new parts and materials while the company fully intended to, and in fact did, purchase and use less expensive recycled or refurbished parts. The settlement was the result of a whistleblower complaint filed by a whistleblower and former executive of Insitu. The whistleblower will receive over $4.6 million from the recovery.

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Texas Heart Hospital to Pay $48 million to Resolve Allegations of False Claims

The DOJ has announced that Texas Heart Hospital of the Southwest LLP and its subsidiary THHBP Management Company, LLC have agreed to pay the US $48 million to settle allegations that the hospital submitted claims to Medicare that were in violation of the Physician Self-Referral Law and the Anti-kickback Statute of the False Claims Act. The allegations of misconduct rest on the hospitals requirement that it’s owners, who are physicians, satisfy a yearly quota of 48 patient contacts in order to maintain ownership. Under the Physician Self-Referral Law, commonly known as the Stark Law, hospitals may not bill Medicare for services furnished by a doctor with which the hospital has a financial relationship, barring certain regulatory exceptions. The law is intended to ensure physicians operate in the best interest of their patients and not under the influence of improper financial inducements.

The settlement is the result of a qui tam complaint brought by two former Texas Heart Hospital physician owners. They will collectively receive almost $14 million as their share in the recovery.

Read the DOJ press release here: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/texas-heart-hospital-and-wholly-owned-subsidiary-thhbp-management-company-llc-pay-48-million

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